Welcome to the walsh art gallery

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Tuesday - Saturday:
11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Also open one hour prior to curtain and during intermission of Quick Center season performances.

The Walsh Art Gallery is FREE and open to the public!

Closed for all University holidays.

Contact:
Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery
Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts
Fairfield University
1073 North Benson Road
Fairfield, CT 06824
203-254-4062
gallery@fairfield.edu


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CURRENT EXHIBITION:                                 

Jason Peters: Refraction

qc_peters_spiderwebApril 24 - June 27, 2014
Fascinated by the destabilization of perception, Jason Peters creates illusory spaces and alternative realities through his work. Intentionally designed to trigger a cathartic sense of the sublime in his viewers, the artist amasses vast quantities of discarded objects from everyday life that he then reconfigures in surprisingly unexpected ways. The results lift these "societal casts-offs" — including contractor's buckets, fluorescent lighting tubes, and metal chair frames — beyond the bounds of ordinary physical existence. In doing so, Peters invites the viewer to see beauty where before there was refuse, to experience flux where before there was stasis, and to experience a focused calm where before there was alarm. In this exhibition, the artist will create several site-specific installations, one of which will respond directly to works on view in La Ragnatela: The Spiderweb Works by Giampaolo Seguso from the Corning Museum of Glass (on view at the Bellarmine Museum of Art, April 10 – June 13, 2014).

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FUTURE EXHIBITIONS:

Not Ready to Make Nice: The Guerrilla Girls in the Artworld and Beyond

qc_guerrilla_girls-150x150September 4 - November 14, 2014
Not Ready to Make Nice, a major presentation of the Guerrilla Girls, illuminates and contextualizes the important historical and ongoing work of these highly original, provocative, and influential artists who champion feminism and social change. The Guerrilla Girls have been powerfully and consistently active since first breaking onto the art scene in 1985. Appearing only in gorilla masks and assuming the names of dead women artists, the activist group has remained anonymous for nearly three decades while revealing shocking truths about sexism and prejudice in the art world and beyond. Beginning with their courageous poster campaigns of the 1980s and continuing with large-scale international projects, they brilliantly take on the art establishment in a way that has never been seen before or since. Using “facts, humor, and fake fur,” they have exposed the discriminatory collecting and exhibiting practices of the most feared art dealers, curators, and collectors. Expanding their work to include non-visual arts media in the 1990s, the Guerrilla Girls have taken on everything from the discrimination of women film directors to the environmental crisis. Focusing primarily on recent work from the past decade, this exhibition features rarely-shown international projects that trace the collective’s artistic and activist influence around the globe. In addition, a selection of iconic work from the 80s and 90s illustrates the formative development of the group’s philosophy and conceptual approach to arts activism. Documentary material, including ephemera, behind-the-scenes photos, and secret anecdotes, reveal the Guerrilla Girls’ process and the events that drive their incisive institutional interventions. Visitors can peruse the artists’ favorite “love letters and hate mail,” and are invited to contribute their own voices to interactive installations. This multimedia, expansive exhibition illustrates that the work of the anonymous, feminist-activist Guerrilla Girls is as vital and revolutionary as ever.
 
Not Ready to Make Nice was curated by Neysa Page-Lieberman and organized by Columbia College Chicago.

Of Time and Buildings

qc_time_buildings_eastman-150x150March 19 – May 29, 2015
Drawn from the unparalleled collections of George Eastman House, approximately 80 works from the nineteenth century to the present show how artists, architects, and others have used photography to depict the human environment over time. New ways of image-making made possible by digital technologies are contrasted with the more evidentiary implications of some earlier approaches. The exhibition includes Gilded Age collotypes of now-vanished New England mansions by an unidentified photographer, mass-produced color lithographs of sites of American memory by William Henry Jackson, and dramatic silver prints of the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition by Kenneth Hedrick. Contemporary art includes John Divola’s conceptually driven series Isolated Houses, Eirik Johnson’s typology of Alaskan hunting cabins in summer and winter, and Feng Bin’s and Odette England’s evocations of vanished sites in China and Australia, respectively. Of interest to students of architecture, architectural photography, history of photography, and contemporary art, as well as a general audience, the exhibition offers cross-disciplinary access to both historical and contemporary practice and a theoretically informed introduction to photographic approaches and ideas.